“Full many a gem of purest ray serene
The dark unfathom’d caves of ocean bear:
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
And waste its sweetness on the desert air.” ― Thomas Gray

rosesMarigold

Today we take a short excursion of thought whereby Gray’s Elegy, Mrs. Elton, and my roses will be connected for the briefest of time.

You see, I can now say ‘my roses’. They are my cherry on the top of what has been a long —and long hoped for—move.

(The WordPress photo challenges are always fun to try and incorporate into a literary theme. This week’s challenge relates to ‘the cherry on the top’ motif; in other words, some extra nicety that makes a good thing even better.)

IMG_4266

The 1959 home we just moved into came with a garden that someone…years ago…once tenderly cared for. Sweet old shrubs and cherry trees; a plethora of apples and dreams of apple pie. This house would have been wonder enough. But the cherry on the top? Two little bedraggled rose bushes. In the words of the beloved garden writer Louise Beebe Wilder, my ‘thoughts are alight’ with them, my heart aglow with a surge of motherly feelings toward my new charges. They shall be given a bath, some nourishment, and a nice pruning. (I will also be adding to their ranks!)

These roses, blooming alone and lovely on neglected bushes for who knows how many years, brought to my mind the well known verse of Thomas Gray, quoted above from Elegy In A Country Churchyard.

Thomas Gray

One thing leads to another. As I can never think of those lines without thinking of Jane Austen’s character Mrs. Elton, there is another, even more subtle ‘cherry on top’ with this post.

We have, in large part, the memorable Mrs. Elton to thank for bringing Thomas Gray’s poetry into modern circulation.

In her novel Emma, Jane Austen created a small masterpiece within a masterpiece in this characterization. Every time Augusta Elton opens her mouth, she relates far more about herself than she intends.

‘Miss Woodhouse, we must exert ourselves and endeavour to do something for her. We must bring her forward. Such talent as hers must not be suffered to remain unknown.—I dare say you have heard those charming lines of the poet,

‘Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
‘And waste its fragrance on the desert air.’

We must not allow them to be verified in sweet Jane Fairfax.”

The intent of Mrs. Elton, as she addressed these words to Emma—her greatest rival for power in the social arena of Highbury, has been seen by scholars as a pointed insult. A slight taunt, a challenge, as it were, borne along by dulcet tones speaking ‘those charming lines‘. Of course there was nothing charming about Mrs. Elton, and of course Emma, as a cultured young woman of her day, would have been quite familiar with Thomas Gray. By Austen’s day he was considered The Poet of the English. And Emma the novel, is essentially, Austen’s paean to all English-ness.

The fact that Mrs. Elton mis-quoted (did Austen intend butchered?) such a well known, beloved poem of England hands the veiled insult right back to the giver. Jane Austen’s brilliance in characterization extended to even the slightest nuances of conversation.

In reading Jane Austen, there is always deliciousness to be found. Sometimes, though, she gives us that extra little cherry of genius on top.

And my two rosebushes will no longer blush unseen.


 

5 thoughts on ““We Must Bring Her Forward”

  1. Glad you are settled. I loved the turn your pen took from each subject and connected them. I could see your rose bush and taste the apple pie. Thank you!

    • Hello suzstraw! I replied to your comment but as usual I hit a wrong button….so it landed dazed, slightly askew and just below your sweet comment. 🙂 But it’s there! Thank you again for visiting.

  2. Thank you! I am still getting settled (most of my books are still in boxes which has to change SOON) but I’m so glad you enjoyed it the post! I hope to write more about my new garden😊

  3. I am trying to build my garden from scratch and it is slow going.. although seeing a humming bird or two and butterflies around my lavender pots give me hope.I hope I see photos of your roses. My books are still in boxes too. I love Emma, when you write of Austen it makes me want to go back and re-read.

    • Oh, thank you! I am delighted to know someone else is starting a garden at about the same time. Mine has good bones, I’m happy to say, (a rockery wall and established trees) but there is nothing like a derelict, tattered garden to stir my enthusiasm. It’s the best kind of creative outlet. Today I just unearthed a couple of my favorite old garden books; happy to think they will not only make for quaint fireside reading, (as has been the case for the last five years) but will be relevant again! Thanks for stopping by. 🙂

Your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s